Podcast: Charlie Chanaratsopon, Founder of Charming Charlie

We’re kicking off another episode of RETHINK Retail with guest Charlie Chanaratsopon.

Charlie is most known for building Charming Charlie to 5,000 employees, 350 stores globally, and $500M in revenue. Charlie recently launched Boosted Commerce, a leading consumer products platform that acquires, launches, and grows third-party sellers on Shopify and Amazon.

Join us as Charlie shares his journey as an entrepreneur, his insights for e-commerce merchants, and his key predictions for the future of digital real estate.

 

Episode 139 of the RETHINK Retail Podcast was recorded on April 14, 2021

 


Hosted by Julia Raymond Hare
Written and produced by Gabriella Bock
Edited by Trenton Waller

TRANSCRIPTION

Julia Raymond Hare:
Hi, today we’re kicking off another episode of Rethink Retail with my guests Charlie Chanaratsopon. Charlie is most known for building, you may have heard of it, Charming Charlie. And he built this Charming Charlie to 5,000 employees, 350 stores globally, and a whopping 500 million in revenue.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Charlie recently launched Boosted Commerce, a leading consumer products platform that acquires launches and grows third-party sellers on both Amazon and Shopify. We’ll get into that a little bit more. Charlie, welcome to the show.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Great, thanks for having me.

Julia Raymond Hare:
It’s great to have you on, I love to speak with retailers, we’ve had a lot on the show in the past, and I wanted to dive in with your background as a retailer and an entrepreneur. Many listeners likely know you as the Charlie of Charming Charlie, but is it true that you launched Charming Charlie as sort of a side hustle?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
I wouldn’t say it’s a side hustle, but I’ll give you a bit of a background story to it. So I’ve always enjoyed business and entrepreneurship as a kid, and really just watching my parents. My parents came to America 45 years ago for college, ended up staying afterwards and becoming entrepreneurs, started several different businesses, and I observed and watched them and their business growing up, and it was just really fun.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
I learned a lot from them, I learned to hustle, as you just said, I learned drive, commitment, as a great example for me to follow, and I think of that often. So I don’t know if it was a side hustle, but it was definitely an all-encompassing hustle, all the time. And yes, so I saw an opportunity to create value not only in real estate, but also in building a retail brand.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so what that means, the idea originally was to build shopping centers that I would anchor and own to Charming Charlie and also the retail stores, and that was around 15 years ago. We did that for the first five shopping centers where I built them ground up and put the stores in them, and it was really exciting, but recognized the opportunity was to scale really quickly, and so focused on building out Charming Charlie, did less of the real estate, and as you just mentioned, we scale it to 360 stores globally for the brand.

Julia Raymond Hare:
That’s amazing, and what would you say is the most challenging, but rewarding part of opening stores? I mean, because to get to 350 is quite the feat, that’s a lot.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. So Charming Charlie’s opening 50 of them this year across the United States, and we still do that activity. I think seeing customers come in and look, touch, play with the product, and the smiles on their face is really rewarding, it’s a good time. and so, and I’m sure we’ll get into this later, but the evolving world of consumer trends and retail, and so I think we’ve seen the change, or the rise of e-comm shopping.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
But you know, there’s still 100% the need for stores. You might not need 1,000 stores, but stores are definitely ways of help activating your brand and your business.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And as an exec in this space, what would you say when the conversation comes up about small format versus large format? Because we hear a lot of both sides of that argument, I know DICK’S Sporting Goods just announced one of its largest stores ever that it’s opening, but there’s a lot that are moving to smaller-format.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. I mean, I think it’s situational, so there’s no perfect answer for the business or brand, but I would imagine, I don’t know the context of what DICK’S doing in the big stores, but I would imagine these are going be the expirational stores, where you have, I would imagine basketball courts, and all sorts of different things they can do to activate their brands and products.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so their product can do all of them that big, I would assume, but they’re going to have black shifts that way, which I think makes sense today, because people will walk in into the physical stores, look on their phones, look at different products and it makes it a real omnichannel 360 experience for the consumer

Julia Raymond Hare:
Keyword, omnichannel, we’re hearing that come up a lot more full circle and post-pandemic, or as we’re coming out a little bit from the pandemic as people get vaccinated, at least on this side of the pond, and I know other regions in Europe are a bit behind still.

Julia Raymond Hare:
But is there something that you would say is the biggest takeaway from the pandemic for Charming Charlie? Do you feel like people will come back to stores relatively soon over the summer?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, you know, I think one of the key themes is overall in business, is we’ve learned that you have to be much more agile and quick, and be flexible. Yeah, I don’t think anyone could have predicted obviously the pandemic and how that has changed the world. People wouldn’t have predicted that five years of consumer shopping from e-commerce growth all happened in four months. I mean, and you’ve pulled that forward, that’s extreme change, and I think everyone’s still just trying to understand how that all comes together.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
But if you think about, 2020 e-commerce sales, we’re at 800 billion. And This year we could be the first year, we’re at a trillion dollars of e-commerce sales. I mean a trillion dollars, that’s quite incredible, right?

Julia Raymond Hare:
Wow!

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And yeah, it’s just the numbers and the evolution is staggering, but you know, it’s an exciting time to be in consumer and where the consumers are shopping, they’re just evolving places. Obviously, mobile first and e-comm and different areas all rising. And so being in front of the consumers is obviously going to be helpful.

Julia Raymond Hare:
So, Charming Charlie, it’s been a crazy year, you’re opening, I think you said 50 stores this year, so there’s a lot ahead, but this isn’t the only focus for you I would say. You have this other company, your latest entrepreneurial endeavor, which is doing extremely well called Boosted Commerce.

Julia Raymond Hare:
You raised, the Rethink Retail team took a look, you raised $137 million during the pandemic from some of the biggest names in tech. We have Zillow’s co-founder Spencer Rascoff and Ellie Seidman, And we all know her as the former CEO of Tinder. Can you dive into a little bit about how you founded Boosted Commerce, and the companies and the services you’re offering for brands and retailers?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Sure. So my co-founder Keith Richmond, and I are friends from a leadership organization called YPO. That’s basically presidents or CEOs running companies, and you join your local chapter. And we’ve been friends for about eight, nine years. And his previous businesses were in tech and performance marketing and marketing related. And obviously, you know my background in e-commerce, in operations, supply chain, people organization, fast scale, et cetera.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Those two backgrounds, if you will, we thought made a lot of sense that they complement each other well and could build the business. And how did that start? He asked me to lunch, just one of these catch-up lunches, and he was tinkering around the idea of talking about e-commerce trends, and the future of tech and consumer trends, and how all this comes together, he was super excited. That lunch eventually over months of discussion became Boosted Commerce, and here we are today.

Julia Raymond Hare:
So do you think it happened super organically or did he invite you to lunch, but it was really kind of a subtle pitch?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
No, it wasn’t really a pitch. So he travels a lot and taking different supplements, I’d call it immunity boosters, health, and wellness. He was researching for all these different products, and obviously Amazon would come up a lot. And as he explored further into it, it’s like, “Wow, who are these sellers on Amazon and how do they start these businesses?”

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so it’s quite amazing what the platform has powered for entrepreneurs, frankly. And so he was the person who dug in first, didn’t have much retail experience, but tech and marketing and said, “Wow, this is a particularly interesting space, look at how we could do all these different things and it’s growing quickly.”

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so we dug in deeper and then that’s how we came together and talked about strategies with things we would do, and then here we are today, so.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And how did you know that it was an opportunity that was needed in the market? Did you talk to some of the bigger Amazon sellers that are doing a large amount of FBA? Or how did that come about? Because it sounds like a perfect transition, you’ve grown it to X amount, and now boosted commerce will step in and take it from here, and it’s a win-win for everyone, but did you know that that was something people were looking for?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. So, the spaces developed in the last, let’s call it three years or two years a lot, but there’s a whole community of brokers and sellers and podcasts for the sellers. And so that opportunity, that’s how that came about. And I think one of the key themes is, I’ve also invested in a cross of direct-to-consumer brands from startup stage, just as a passive investor.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And one of the things we recognize, that I’ve recognized through the years is it’s not as easy to scale up from the beginning. And the risk profiles of it is higher, and why is that? Because you have to bring consumers your storefront, which means you have to market really well on Facebook or Google or whichever channel you’re doing.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
One of the interesting things of what Amazon has done, is they bring you the customers. Well, they bring you their customers to be specific, but they’ve made the world of, you know, every kind of value proposition for a consumer super easy to shop. And so I’m sure you are year-over-year billed in Amazon boxes is higher than a year or two years ago, it keeps on growing.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And why is that?  This goes back to fundamentals—good retail and good brand building. They give pretty unrivaled value to the consumers. Everybody’s used to two-day shipping now, but you know, two-day shipping-

Julia Raymond Hare:
If it’s more than two days, forget it.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Right, two days shipping, great prices, why not? And then you saw the birth of the third-party sellers. And today there are 50,000 sellers doing, from what we’re reading a million dollars or more, which is pretty big, that’s a large set of entrepreneurs out there. And so it’s a fascinating space, and it keeps on evolving.

Julia Raymond Hare:
It really is because it’s not only Amazon.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, you have Alibaba, you have Lazada, you have Flipkart, that’s why in our lens here, this is not really in our, you know, if we talk about Boosted Commerce, our lens over time, this is the consumer products platform, e-commerce of tomorrow in a way. Because over time, if you have X amount of brands on your platform, you can put them obviously in different channels.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
There are retail channels, there are other platform channels, the digital shelf is going to keep expanding. And so as long as you have a great, I’d call it a great product catalog, you can distribute your brands and products in different areas. And so that’s how we kind of think about the space overall over time.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And you said, as long as you have a great product catalog, you can keep expanding, and if we took a look at the numbers, just for U.S., Amazon sellers are expected to surpass half of the e-commerce market by the end of this year. So that’s a big uptick.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And we also note that Walmart is in this equation as well. They do have a competitive marketplace that’s on the rise. What do you think about that? Do you think there’ll be some collaboration potentially between the sellers on all of these platforms?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. You know, what’s frankly amazing of what’s going on in, in consumer and e-commerce is Walmart used to be the biggest company in the world, but now Amazon pre-COVID was like at 800 billion, these numbers are staggering. $800 billion market cap business today. Today, I looked it up before we talked, just to get a sense, $1.7 trillion.

Julia Raymond Hare:
You Know it’s hard to conceptualize what a trillion is, right? It’s huge.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And just to put in perspective, that’s more than a few GDPs of countries put together in one market cap of a company. I mean, it’s just staggering numbers. And obviously Walmart is also very large. And between the two of them in terms of market share, I believe Walmart is like, you know, 70 billion now in e-commerce. And so between the two of them, they’re over 55 or 60% of the market of e-commerce. They have a large share of the marketplace, if you will.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
You know, there’s Walmart, they have a different kind of I’d say positive value attributes, absolutely. They have their, I know what it’s like for 5,000 stores, that they can learn and then that they can, you know, they have a brick and mortar infrastructure that can help them have an advantage. So how does this all play out? There’s definitely room for more than two players for sure, and they have the capital and they have the resources to compete. And so I do think there’ll be a rising tide for both of them though, actually.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Well, what do you think this is something just personally, I’m interested in about the idea of curated marketplaces, versus something like Walmart and Amazon, where it’s pretty much fair game for any product out there.

Julia Raymond Hare:
So do you think that’s on the rise? I mean, with Shopify, especially.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. What’s amazing also, there are so many elements of things that have evolved so quickly. But if you think about one of the largest furniture companies in the world is Wayfair, and Wayfair doesn’t actually own much furniture as a marketplace. You think about Neiman Marcus and then you think about TheRealReal, TheRealReal is a luxury reseller, and does not hold any inventory.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
So these specialty platforms are growing and scaling. And if they have enough users and sellers, they can grow and scale. So Chewy’s obviously for pet has grown nicely.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Really cool. Shout out to Chewy for the great work they’re doing, and we’ll probably see more across other markets. I wanted to ask you, Charlie, if I am an Amazon seller, I’m doing over a million or plus, how would I get involved with Boosted Commerce, and what would that look like?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. So if you decide that you’ve grown your business, and Julia starts a company and it’s growing nicely, and doing a million dollars or $2 million now, and we see that as, wow. I mean, the universe there mostly is I’d call it solo entrepreneurs that have really worked really hard, and grown their business, and done everything from figuring out the right products to sell, figuring out the right marketing to do, finding the right vendor, making sure the quality is correct and scaling their business.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And they get to, you know, a million dollars, $2 million, and the business gets a little more difficult. In a sense of, now you have to get more money to go buy more inventory. The more you grow, the more cash you need to go buy more inventory. At times you’re importing it from China, you have to get through freight boarders, the tarrifs, all these things, it becomes at times a bit more complicated.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so you might say, “Hey, look, I’ve built this up, I’m a successful entrepreneur and this has worked really well, and I want to bring in a partner or sell my business.” And I think you can just go to Boosted Commerce’s website and submit your business, and someone on the team will call and respond.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Great. So it sounds like you’re definitely an option, you said it’s a lot of times solo entrepreneurs, where they’ve, they’ve reached a point maybe where it’s time to sell, in order for their business to continue scaling with a large team.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, yeah. No, for sure. It’s amazing again, what Amazon and Shopify buy has enabled, and it’s almost demarketization of product development in a way. So you have all these people creating products out there and finding the hustle, finding which one works, finding why. And by the way you hear about all the ones that do well, and this is just the same with, and kind of any startup, right?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
It’s probably a lot more fail that you don’t hear about. I wouldn’t say fail and learn, and they get up and do it again. Because it’s not easy obviously, but the sheer volume of people coming on to these platforms is enormous. And so you hear the stories of the ones that found the right product, and did the things they need to do to grow business, and they have, which is remarkable, so.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Indeed it is remarkable, and the growth, as you said, is driven by a lot of these solo entrepreneurs, that sometimes fail or learn and then try again. What would you say, you know, you’ve built an amazing company, Charming Charlie. So from the retail side of things, do you think that’s helped a lot? I know you mentioned your co-founder comes a lot from the tech space, so combining your e-commerce and retail expertise with his, is that sort of the gold standard for this?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Well, I don’t know if it’s a gold standard, I think that we’re all, again, I want say prisoners of our past, but we learn from our past and we learn from our mistakes, and we learn from our wins. So I think one of the key themes is that if you build a continuous learning organization that, you know, things can come well, right? Because as any business that starts up, there’s a lot of things that you have that are unpredictable, and you have to be super agile to go fix, or edit or, you know, the whole litany of things that happen. And so I think with that really comes around, like growing a team and building a team, that can go help execute the vision for the company.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Mm-hmm (affirmative), and not only that, but you are soon announcing your seller’s circle. So it’s not like a transaction and you say, “All right, thanks, bye.” It’s something where there continued to be within the Boosted Commerce ecosystem and sort of a part of things if they want to be. And it sounds really cool what you guys are offering in the Seller’s Circle, can you tell us a little bit more about that?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, sure. So, you know, after you sell a business, and we’ve been on the other side of this both my co-founder and I before, and afterwards you think about, you know, what to do next or what are other things? Because entrepreneurs generally from my experience are not, one time and done. Entrepreneurs are entrepreneurs because they love it. And so yes, it can be rewarding yet it could be difficult, but I think a common theme that you see is that, you know, these entrepreneurs are curious, they want to learn, and it’s all about content self-development.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so one of the things we wanted to do is bring in some of our peers that we view, captains of industry, if you will. And so we have investors in our business that, you know, if it’s Tom Staggs who’s the former president, or our CEO of Disney that does a webinar with us, or if it’s Spencer, I think you mentioned that the co-founder of Zillow, they come from different industries and different startups, different size companies, but there’s always lessons learned from business in general.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And we think our sellers, as we’ve talked to them, at least value some of the things that they can, you know, continue with their career development, and continue with their learning. And so there are some of the aspects of that, that we’re working on, but I think that they will enjoy, so.

Julia Raymond Hare:
I love that. And it’s great that you’re able to offer that to the retailers you work with, because some of the names I know in the press release, there was president of the LA Dodgers, you might bring him in, and just people you wouldn’t have access to otherwise who are experts and might be able to provide another perspective. So I think that is amazing.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And I wanted to ask you a bit of a broader question if we take a bird’s eye view, what do you think e-commerce and digital real estate we could even call it, will look like in 2025, a few years from now?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, if I knew, wow. But I can take a guess, I’ll take a guess. So, you know, it’s interesting, it’s like, COVID really pulled up years of online shopping or e-commerce pop. So I think about my mom, my aunts, while before they would ask me to buy them stuff online, now it’s everybody had to be trained quickly. So what does that mean?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And you know, 2025 while it feels like it’s far away, it’s just a few years out. And it seems like to me at least, with the, you know, mobile phones and how quickly they’re progressing with improving technology, consumers will be able to buy anywhere they shop, try on products with augmented reality before buying, engineering virtual sessions of retail shopping experiences. Click a button, it shows up to their house.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
I’ve demoed or seen some version of these, and it hasn’t fully operated yet, but I assume when these things start going, you’ll start seeing some of these things. And I do think that omnichannel will be fully adopted across retail companies. It’s really a must-have. And how do you interplay your physical store venues, and making them an asset, excuse me, and not a liability. And you absolutely can do that.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And then thirdly, digitally-native brands, it’s interesting, I think you asked me that question before. I think they’ll continue to grow and steal market share from existing retail giants. And Walmart, Amazon, these platforms will continue to scale. And so wherever you are in a sense of, for your phone, your tablet, it seems a bit spooky sometimes, where if I click on something online, it shows up on my computer, then it shows up on my phone, because everything’s being tracked much more.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
But it’s the ease and frictionless shopping will continue. And real estate [inaudible 00:26:33] obviously used to be much more on your laptop and now it’s much, it’s more on your phone. And I think people have seen that shift over time, and you see it in e-commerce trends of your traffic from desktop, laptop, to iPad, to phone. And that shift to your phone has continued to take even more share of the digital real estate.

Julia Raymond Hare:
It certainly has.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, for sure.

Julia Raymond Hare:
I just looked them up yesterday, and mobile has overtaken desktop for the main channel people are purchasing e-commerce, I think it was like 56% or something, which doesn’t sound shocking, because we’re like, “Yeah, we’re all on our phones all the time, we know that.” But if you look just five years ago, it was the inverse.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yep, no for sure. And you think about your phone today, the processing the speed of your iPhone 12, or Samsung Galaxy is faster than computer eight years ago. And so that’s why if we’re going to sit around trying to shop online with our phones eight years ago, the ease just wasn’t there. And if you could imagine you asked me the question in 20 25, I can only imagine how much faster all the processing becomes, and it’s just much more frictionless.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
So it’s almost like buy from anywhere if you will. And that’s also with like live shopping on Instagram or Facebook, or any of these platforms now that they just make it easier and easier, so.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Absolutely, and you mentioned a few things, you said, the innovative retail models that you mentioned, and then stores as assets, not liabilities, omnichannel mobile, the growth of digitally native brands will continue. And then we were even touching on some of the crazy advancements in technology over the past eight years, and it kind of reminded me of, did you guys see the viral video the other day, it was about Elon Musk’s Neuralink, they had the monkey with the chip in his brain playing pong?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
I didn’t, but it sounds like you should email me the link afterwards.

Julia Raymond Hare:
I will, I’ll send it to you, it’s crazy. I mean, it’s for a good goal, it’s to help people who are amputees be able to move the arm or whatever it is with their mind through the computer chip, but it is kind of creepy in a way. So I’ll have to send you that.

Julia Raymond Hare:
And then I would say, I have two last questions for you, Charlie. One, and you touched on this a little bit, you said curiosity, but what is something you would say makes a successful entrepreneur?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, so I’d say number one, this is super important, and this is for people that we look forward to hire, equality, if you will, on our leadership teams, is number one is a growth mindset. And what does that mean? I think two sayings that really resonate with me that I always remember about growth mindset is, the saying, “Win or learn.”

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Win or learn. And I think most people say, “Hey, you win or you lose.” So I guess in my career as an entrepreneur, I’ve had hundreds and hundreds of lessons under my belt. And so, you know, so what I’m saying there, is I learn more from my mistakes than I have from my wins. And all those learnings help you in your future endeavors, because it’s a continuous, you’re growing, you’re learning, you’re improving all the time. So that’s for growth mindset.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And I think another thing, another thing we’d like to say also is, play to win. And what I mean by that is when you look at successful growing companies or growing companies, period, they do mostly play to win, and they’re playing offense, right? Some people have, I wouldn’t say a different mindset, but slightly different lens to it, and I call that playing not to lose. Those are subtle adjustments, but they’re very different in mindset.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
And so for us growing mindset and for entrepreneurs, you know, we always want to play to win. And an easy way to make an example about that is in sports, right? You see if the sports team is up 20 points in the Superbowl in the fourth quarter, the other team will play not to lose and play the defense, nothing wrong with that, but you can imagine offense, you got to be moving forward, especially for entrepreneurship, because nothing just comes to you, you got to go get it. So for entrepreneurship.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Definitely, win or learn and play to win, those are the two. And what’s what strikes me about how you just described both of those concepts is that it’s all about in a way perspective, and how you’re viewing things. Because a lot of people hit the wall and they don’t get up again, they say, “Well, I tried.” But like you said, you’ve had hundreds of lessons, learning lessons and you just keep-

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. Well, I think one of the questions you asked me, I love the word hustle actually. You said, “Did the business start from a side hustle?” As an entrepreneur, it’s very different, I guess. And there’s nothing wrong with working in a big organization either, that’s also great opportunities. So I think that just some elements that you have as an entrepreneur, you got to go after it and you have to have a can-do attitude.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
You have to have curiosity, ask questions, lots of them, things don’t just come, right? So if you so-called ‘fail’, I call it learn like we just said, get up and go again. Like you have to acknowledge that 90% of startups don’t make it. So if your first one doesn’t make it, you can go into your second one. And so you need perseverance, you need hustle, growth mindset, those things can really kind of help you propel. Because at times it’s not the easiest part of the journey, there’s not wins all the time.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Amen to that.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, and how you reflect. And I think entrepreneurs will identify with that, you can reflect on that. And as we talked to these sellers, at Boosted Commerce that we’re acquiring, we really approach it like, “Wow, look what you even built?” No, that’s just amazing. And how can we help boost your business even further? That’s the lens that we approach.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Very good lens to approach it from, and like you said, I think it will ring true with a lot of entrepreneurs who are listening to the show. And I like to wrap up sometimes with kind of an offbeat question, speaking of getting down and coming back up again, there’s a brand.

Julia Raymond Hare:
So I looked up, what are the top-selling items on Amazon this week, and I guess not surprisingly in the clothing, shoes and jewelry section, the number two item, it’s a shoe, can you guess what shoe it is, it’s a very highly identifiable shoe? They weren’t cool for a long time, and now they’re cool again.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
What is it, Crocs or Dr. Martens?

Julia Raymond Hare:
Yes, it’s Crocs, you got it. I thought that was interesting. Gosh, I’ve seen Crocs everywhere recently, and it’s just kind of funny that it’s on there. So, good job.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah. I know, I just completely guessed, but I know this because my son’s turning four, and he’s got all those little, you know, he has a few pairs now. So, you know, I remember-

Julia Raymond Hare:
Oh, lovely.

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
Yeah, yeah.

Julia Raymond Hare:
Yeah, he’s got some slags, croc slags?

Charlie Chanaratsopon:
(laughs) Yeah.

Julia Raymond Hare:
That’s amazing. So thank you, Charlie, for coming on the show, I hope to have you again in the future.

Title

Go to Top